Courses

  • English 103: Word Stress Pattern

    by Rextorial
    11 Lessonsin

    Introduction to Word Stress Pattern

  • English 102: Lexical Structure

    by Rextorial
    2 Lessonsin

  • English 101: Oral/Phonetics

    by Rextorial
    11 Lessonsin

    Diphthongs are sometimes referred to as "long vowels" but this is misleading. While vowel sounds do change in a diphthong, they do not necessarily take more time to say than a monophthong. The rule of thumb is: If the sound moves, it’s a diphthong; if it's static, it’s a monophthong. Each of the following diphthongs is represented by its phonetic symbol.

  • Maths 205: Circle Geometry - Pythagoras Theorem

    by Rextorial
    3 Lessonsin

    Introduction to Circle Geometry Pythagoras Theorem Statement Pythagoras theorem states that “In a right-angled triangle,  the square of the hypotenuse side is equal to the sum of squares of the other two sides“. The sides of these triangles have been named as Perpendicular, Base and Hypotenuse. Here, the hypotenuse is the longest side, as it is opposite to the angle 90°. The sides of a right triangle (say x, y and z) which has positive integer values, when squared are put into an equation, also called a Pythagorean triple.  

  • Maths 204: Quadratic Equation

    by Rextorial
    4 Lessonsin

    Introduction to Quadratic Equation In algebra, a quadratic equation (from the Latin quadratus for “square”) is any equation that can be rearranged in standard form as {\displaystyle ax^{2}+bx+c=0} where x represents an unknown, and a, b, and c represent known numbers, where a ≠ 0. If a = 0, then the equation is linear, not quadratic, as there is no {\displaystyle ax^{2}} term. The numbers a, b, and c are the coefficients of the equation and may be distinguished by calling them, respectively, the quadratic coefficient, the linear coefficient and the constant or free term. The values of x that satisfy the equation are called solutions of the equation, and roots or zeros of the expression on its left-hand side. A quadratic equation has at most two solutions. If there is no real solution, there are two complex solutions. If there is only one solution, one says that it is a double root. A quadratic… Read More

  • Maths 203: Modular Arithmetic

    by Rextorial
    2 Lessonsin

    Introduction to Modular Arithmetics Modular arithmetic is a system of arithmetic for integers, which considers the remainder. In modular arithmetic, numbers “wrap around” upon reaching a given fixed quantity (this given quantity is known as the modulus) to leave a remainder. Modular arithmetic is used extensively in pure mathematics, where it is a cornerstone of number theory. But it also has many practical applications. It is used to calculate checksums for international standard book numbers (ISBNs) and bank identifiers (Iban numbers) and to spot errors in them. The modulus is another name for the remainder after division. For example, 17 mod 5 = 2, since if we divide 17 by 5, we get 3 with remainder 2. Modular arithmetic is sometimes called clock arithmetic,… Read More

  • Maths 202: Law of Indices

    by Rextorial
    2 Lessonsin

    Introduction to Law of Indices Laws of indices. Indices are used to show numbers that have been multiplied by themselves. They can also be used to represent roots, such as the square root, and some fractions. The laws of indices enable expressions involving powers to be manipulated more efficiently than writing them out in full. An index, or power, is the small floating number that appears after a number or letter. The plural of index is indices. Indices show how many times a number or letter has been multiplied by itself.  (read as ‘  squared’) means .  has been multiplied by itself twice. The index, or power, here is 2.  (read as ‘  cubed’) means .  has been multiplied by… Read More

  • Maths 201: Number Bases

    by Rextorial
    4 Lessonsin

    Introduction to Number Bases A number base is the number of digits or combination of digits that a system of counting uses to represent numbers. A base can be any whole number greater than 0. The most commonly used number system is the decimal system, commonly known as base 10. … For example, 178 is read as 17 base 8, which is 15 in base 10. Converting between different number bases is actually fairly simple, but the thinking behind it can seem a bit confusing at first. And while the topic of different bases may seem somewhat pointless to you, the rise of computers and computer graphics has increased the need for knowledge of how to work with different (non-decimal) base systems, particularly binary systems (ones and zeroes) and hexadecimal systems (the… Read More